Soil Health Improvement Tracking

Microbial biomass (MB) is the best single indicator of soil health (Doran, 2000). Microbes feed and protect plants, build soil structure which prevents erosion, increase water holding capacity, and build soil organic matter (SOM). MB is low in any situation that is harmful to plant growth (and vice versa) and protects against pathogens, thereby reducing the need for pesticides. MB can predict success before plant outcome. The Fungal:Bacterial ratio (F:B) of the MB provides crucial information regarding colonization by Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi (AMF), and the recycling metabolic processes of saprophytic fungi (SpF).

Soil stewards all over the world are seeking to understand the microbial levels in their soil and the ratio of fungal to bacterial life. The higher the microbial biomass, the more nutrients will be available to plants naturally, decreasing or eliminating the need for chemical fertilizers. Higher fungal to bacterial ratios are critical for building soil structure that prevents erosion and runoff off of pollutant chemicals while building moisture holding capacity of the soil and sequestering carbon.

Soil health is fast becoming one of the most important factors in agriculture and in the growing efforts to improve the earth’s stock of agricultural land. Farmers, industry, and environmentalists are looking for cost-effective and reliable ways to measure soil health and to assess impacts of progressive changes to soil and harvest management.

Testing soil in homogeneous sections at similar stages of the growth cycle can set a baseline for microbial biomass and fungal to bacterial ratio. That baseline can be used to assess how different stewardship practices are impacting the soil and allow for refinement to soil management plans and show soil health improvement over time. While every soil steward’s situation is unique, microBIOMETER® can help measure, follow, and assess efficacy of improvement to soil health.