Stony Brook, NY; Stony Brook University: Sharon Pochron, Ph.D., Sustainability Studies Program/School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences and co-authors (L-R) Mateo Metic (Grad student-SoMAS), Wade Tucker (Freshman-SoMAS), and Zimuzo Ezedum (2020 Biology Graduate) with a handful of Earthworms (Eisenia fetida) used in their Roundup® exposure test.

microBIOMETER® collaborates with university soil study

Earthworms recover from Roundup exposure

The effect of various Roundup formulations and microplastics on soil.

Dr. Sharon Pochron and her students at Stonybrook University in New York have been using microBIOMETER® for two years. Dr. Pochron studies the effect of various Roundup formulations and microplastics on soil microbes and soil invertebrates.

Her most recent publication (See Figure 2) shows microbial biomass increasing on day 7 in both the Roundup treated and untreated soils – the 0 line depicts the microbial biomass on day 0. This increase is probably due to the soil microbes responding to rewetting. By day 14 the microbial biomass in the uncontaminated soil is back to baseline, but the Roundup treated soil has dropped well below baseline. By day 21 both soils have returned to baseline. This study shows only total microbial biomass recovery, but there is evidence that Roundup can affect microbial composition.

Source: Earthworms (Eisenia fetida) recover from Roundup® exposure. Pochron et al., 2021 Applied Soil Ecology. 158: 103793.

Prolific Earth Sciences is supporting research at various universities. Feel free to contact us to discuss your project and how we can assist.