microBIOMETER® testing for soil health and yield stability

Nature article reports that microbial biomass estimates by microBIOMETER® correlates with soil health and yield stability.

The microBIOMETER® soil test was used to report microbial biomass in a recent Nature publication*. Scientists Dr. Judith Fitzpatrick and Dr. Brady Trexler of microBIOMETER® collaborated with a University of Tennessee team headed by Dr. Amin Nouri. The team evaluated the effects on soil health and yield stability of 39 different methods of raising cotton over 29 years. The conditions tested included till, no-till, various cover crops and different levels of nitrogen fertilization.

The study found that the major impacts on yield were very dry or wet conditions, and low or high temperatures. The deleterious effects of these weather extremes on yield were mitigated by regenerative agricultural practices which resulted in adequate soil, C, N, soil structure and microbial biomass.

Conservation agriculture increases the soil resilience and cotton yield stability in climate extremes of the southeast US

*Nouri, A., Yoder, D.C., Raji, M., Ceylan, S., Jagadamma, S., Lee, J., Walker, F.R., Yin, X., Fitzpatrick, J., Trexler, B. and Arelli, P., 2021. Conservation agriculture increases the soil resilience and cotton yield stability in climate extremes of the southeast US. Communications Earth & Environment, 2(1), pp.1-12.

microBIOMETER® Soil Testing in France

The Biospheres, working through the CDA*,  accompanies and trains farmers/agricultural companies in the agroecological transition based on a soil conservation approach. The group is also working on applied research projects and therefore on trials under real farming conditions in which they evaluate the impact of certain changes in practices on different indicators (biological, chemical, physical, economic).

“One of our primary objectives is that farmers succeed in putting biology back into their soils to ensure their natural fertility. We are therefore very interested in everything that lives in the soil, from earthworms and microarthropods to microorganisms (bacteria, fungi, nematodes). For us, microbial biomass is one of the most important indicators that help us understand soil biology. Fungal to bacterial ratio, which is a less documented indicator for the moment, remains interesting to observe in certain situations and is the object of real research by our R&D team to understand how best to interpret it.

We have been using microBIOMETER® for 8 months now to test the soil in different projects in our panel of biological indicators. microBIOMETER® provides us with quick and easy results on microbial biomass and F:B ratio which is a real plus for us. We can perform tests directly in the field and present the results to the farmers. Moreover, the affordable price of the analysis allows us to perform soil biology tests in projects where we had no affordable way to do so before.”

*CDA, Centre de Développement de l’Agroécologie, are affiliates dedicated to R&D and advisory.

 

 

Soil Testing at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette

soil testing
University of Louisiana at Lafayette

Last semester Soil Science and Environmental Pedology students under a supervision of Dr. Anna Paltseva [annapaltseva.com] conducted a soil microbial experiment on campus of University of Louisiana at Lafayette. First, each of the group of students collected different samples. Samples were collected from lawn, vegetable containers, around tree pits, and a native plants garden. The soil samples were analyzed in accordance with the provided procedure, which is simple and fast. The microBIOMETER® app tested the samples and gave each of the readings. The readings were in microbial biomass expressed in microbial-carbon per gram of soil (ug/g) and fungal to bacteria ratio F:B, F% and B%.

The vegetable container and samples from the tree pits showed the highest range of 400 – 800 ug/g. This is due to high organic matter content. The low results from the lawns may have been due to limited microbiological diversity due to monoculture of grasses grown. The areas close to the water bodies (culvert, pond, etc.) may have been lower due to organic matter washing away over time. All the samples were predominantly rich in bacterial population over fungal.

“microBIOMETER® is a very efficient and time saving tool. It can be used by scientists, farmers, or a gardener in learning the microbial health of their soil. This testing process is also very non-invasive, and thus having a lesser negative environmental impact compared to traditional testing. One of the students said, It was pretty cool using an app to analyze soil. I want to know how it works since it all felt like magic.” – Dr. Anna Paltseva

Click here to view the student’s video.

Order a microBIOMETER® Academia Kit for soil testing in your classroom! 

If you are interested in Dr. Paltseva’s research or would like to learn more about urban soils, please follow her on Instagram.

soil testing
Microbial Biomass Chart
  • The chart above and text was prepared by Blair Miller.  It is based on the microBIOMETER® Test conducted on University of Louisiana at Lafayette campus.
  • Video prepared by Ethan Trahan demonstrating how students use microBIOMETER® Test on University of Louisiana at Lafayette campus.
  • Students appearing in the video from the School of Geoscience at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette include: Tristen Ashworth, Blair Miller, Sydney Renard, Austin Delaney, Andrew Womble, Susmita Shrestha, Isabelle Ordonez, Sherry Pinell, Kenneth Despain, and Ashton Young.

 

microBIOMETER® at Penn State University.

Left: “Intensive” section. Right: “Extensive” section

We began offering microBIOMETER® Academia Classroom Kits  last year and are excited with the interest we have received so far from universities, high schools and other academic institutions in the U.S. and abroad. Professors are utilizing our soil test to introduce their students to the world of microbes and soil health.

Mary Ann Bruns, Professor of Soil Microbiology at Penn State University  recently shared how students in her Soil Ecology class used microBIOMETER® to analyze microbial biomass in the 10-year-old Green Roof Medium of the Forest Resources Building on campus.

Students took composite samples from the “intensive” section (where rooting medium was originally 12 inches in depth) and the adjacent “extensive” section (depth of 4 inches). Samples were taken next to the blue fescue plants in both sections.

Having a deeper layer of growth medium provides more water and nutrients for plants, so the hypothesis was that samples from intensive (healthier) areas would have higher MBC than those from extensive (dried out) areas. Average depths were 7.1 and 3.8 inches, respectively, in intensive and extensive areas. Average MBC for the two areas were 253 and 159 micrograms per gram medium, respectively. Click here to read the full report.

A special thank you to Mary Ann and her students for sharing their research, data and photos! If you would like to share your student’s microBIOMETER® research in our newsletter or learn more about our Academia Classroom Kits, please contact us.

From left to right: Penn State students Tyler Gryskevicz, Amanda Grube and Jason Ben Legayada.

Soil research using microBIOMETER®

In the spring and early summer of 2020, the Nutrient Management Spear Program at Cornell University conducted a soil survey of yield-stability based management zones on a New York dairy farm.

Ben Lehman, research assistant in the Nutrient Management Spear Program at Cornell University, completed a study on the Within- Field Variability of Soil Characteristics and Corn Yield Stability on a New York Dairy Farm.

Ben utilized microBIOMETER® in his research to determine the microbial biomass of the soil samples.

This study was presented at the 2020 American Society of Agronomy Annual Meeting.

Source: Cornell Center for Materials Research

Variance in soil samples explained

Often, we are asked about variance – different results when you test the same sample. Our answer is that nature produces most of this variance. To explain, when you measure out 0.5 cc of soil, you have on average about 0.6 grams of soil. If your microBIOMETER® results read 300ugMBC/gram of soil, that means you have 600ug of microbial biomass – we divide the number we get by ½ because the literature tells us that 50% of the dried MB is carbon. As dried bacteria is estimated to weigh 1pg, if this were all bacteria, it constitutes 600,000,000pg or 600 million bacteria.

Now imagine that I have 600 apartment buildings in NYC that each contain 1 million people, and I decide to check 10 apartments in 10 buildings at 4 p.m. to estimate the number of people actually in the building. Obviously, it would vary because people are not always in their apartment and different apartments have different numbers of inhabitants – the same is true for soil.

Soil contains microscopic aggregates of different sizes and the number and type of inhabitants in each varies on the physical and chemical composition of the space as well as the nutrient, pH and hydration level. Each sample you take is like looking at a number of different apartments in a number of apartment buildings.

For this reason, when conducting research, soil and medical researchers run duplicates or triplicates. Because of cost, soil labs generally do not run duplicates and they see 10- 25% variation. We are recommending running duplicates when using microBIOMETER® unless you are doing academic research. Generally, we see <10% variation for a given sample, and for a field that looks homogeneous. Pastures can have much higher variation because the nutrients level across the area varies tremendously.

microBIOMETER® collaborates with university soil study

Earthworms recover from Roundup exposure

The effect of various Roundup formulations and microplastics on soil.

Dr. Sharon Pochron and her students at Stonybrook University in New York have been using microBIOMETER® for two years. Dr. Pochron studies the effect of various Roundup formulations and microplastics on soil microbes and soil invertebrates.

Her most recent publication (See Figure 2) shows microbial biomass increasing on day 7 in both the Roundup treated and untreated soils – the 0 line depicts the microbial biomass on day 0. This increase is probably due to the soil microbes responding to rewetting. By day 14 the microbial biomass in the uncontaminated soil is back to baseline, but the Roundup treated soil has dropped well below baseline. By day 21 both soils have returned to baseline. This study shows only total microbial biomass recovery, but there is evidence that Roundup can affect microbial composition.

Source: Earthworms (Eisenia fetida) recover from Roundup® exposure. Pochron et al., 2021 Applied Soil Ecology. 158: 103793.

Prolific Earth Sciences is supporting research at various universities. Feel free to contact us to discuss your project and how we can assist.